Talking Stone Film

Film Reviews & Headlines


(uplifting piano music) – [Sven] Almost daily I get asked this question more than any other. How do I become a working editor? Like, the kind of editor that works on recognizable features or TV shows. The one that always works
and gets paid full rate. I just got this text the other day. – [Woman] Can I ask you something? – [Sven] Yes. – [Woman] I’m not an idiot.
This is my dream job. It’s what I’ve wanted to be since I was 15 years old. So, I prepared myself for the rejection that comes with the industry. But, did you ever have a time that you were faced with
rejection after rejection, after rejection, that
you considered quitting? It’s been three full
years of solid rejection, and honestly, I think
a human being can only take so much of it. – [Sven] Yes, I’ve been there. It sucks. But, I figured out some stuff, and I think I can help. I’ve had, what many consider, a successful editing career. I’ve worked three and a half years for James Cameron, five plus years as the go-to editor for Fremantle Media, the makers of American Idol, cutting pilots, and show concepts, helping them sell hundreds of millions of dollars worth of new shows, and I could pretty much name my rate. Is it because I’m so talented that I know more than any others? I don’t think so. It has to do with more than skill. It has to do with storytelling and with who you are as a person. I got another one from a producer I worked with seven years ago. – [Producer] Hey Sven, remember me? Well, I’m doing this Fox show, shooting ten episodes for air,
looking for great editors. Still remember all the
times you bailed me out, just wondering if you had any availability in the next four months. And if you can’t do it,
other recommendations would be appreciated. – [Sven] Unfortunately, I’m not available, but let me reach out to a few editors that I feel comfortable
recommending to you. – [Producer] Appreciate
the help, my friend. – [Sven] Of course, I
recommended the early editor from above, and
she sent off her resume. For the past two and
a half years, I’ve put my editing life online,
on a YouTube channel called, This Guy Edits. Currently, it has over
210,000 subscribers, that watch me edit and
talk about storytelling. I want to take this
experience to a new level, where I want to share
everything I know about being a go-to editor. The go-to editor rarely
ever sends out a resume, because they’ve kept right
through the competition. The type of editor that
doesn’t work on a budget, and instead can demand a rate that values their time. Because, what the go-to
editor brings to the table saves the client every time. The go-to editor course
is the only one out there that doesn’t just teach you editing, it’s a step-by-step
program created to give you the tools to become a go-to editor, so that you can work for
a future that is bright. Starting with the basics,
then focusing on storytelling, exposing you to exercises
with real footage of actual features, documentaries
and brand of content. And on top, I’m giving
you a step-by-step program to brand yourself as a go-to editor, including a mock-job interview and negotiating tactics. I put everything that
I know and I’ve learned in the past twenty years in this course. And here’s the thing,
I give you six months to change your mind, as long
as you do the exercises. Don’t see any value in the course? I will refund you the money. So, don’t miss out, don’t delay. The go-to editor course is only open for a few days, then the doors will be shut, so I can focus on the students. Here’s how you become a go-to editor. (door opens) Well, hello there. I want
to read a text to you. “Sven. Hi! How is your schedule in May? I just had an editor fall out. If you’re available May 1st til’ June 7th, want me to pitch you to Netflix? Directing a Netflix Original Mocumentary.” Doing a show on Netflix? Am I going to take it? I’m going to talk about
the steps I’ll take to secure that job, as well
as the three top reasons why I get hired as a film editor. All of that and more in this video. (ominous music) So, I got this text
yesterday and it’s actually a perfect opportunity to
talk about this topic. Why do you get hired as an editor? It’s about your career,
career development. The reason why I got
this text is because on the other side, there’s an emergency. Somebody dropped out and it’s so important that, that next name that
comes to mind is yours. That’s a trait of a go-to editor. Alex and I have worked together
on really just one project. I cut her short many years ago. But, we’ve been in touch and we’ve been friends ever since. – You can open your eyes. – [Woman] I wanna climb it. – Really?
– Yes! (laughs) – [Sven] This is really the
top reason why I get hired. People that had a great
experience and that has to do, very little of
with the actual work. Yes, my storytelling, my
editing, my performance needs to be top par, but it’s
the whole package really. How that producer, director felt like when they were in the bay, and when they saw their project come to life. – You’re not just a fly-by knight. You’re here for them and
that’s what I look for when I’m looking to hire somebody. And that’s what I try to give off, and that’s what I try to
do when I’m looking to become a vendor for somebody, so to say. I have developed
relationships with my clients, that now we’re friends. My best clients that I have are the best relationships that I have. – And this is something
that you might think is so obvious, because
every editor is going to be out there and is trying to keep that client happy. But, only maybe, ten
percent of the editors that are really working and doing a career are really out-performing in that regard. And I have another
surprise for you, because I met two people through this YouTube channel, that helped me on a couple of videos. They’re from Reno, but we fostered a relationship that preserved. Eventually, they decided, not because of me, but because they
felt like they wanted to make that move anyway,
to come out to LA. And I was really wanting to do a course for a long time, but it was hard for me to do it alone. I was looking for people
that could help me. And Vinny and Steve, were the ones that I know can do the job,
because they’ve proven to me, over and over again, when we worked on other projects on the channel. So, I’m excited to meet
them in a little bit. But, let me get to the second reason why I think people get hired,
over and over again. (upbeat music) When I talk about the work, what I really mean is stuff that people are fans of. Like, I got a lot of jobs for the film, the “End of Love”, which
was a film at Sundance. It’s a very unique film. A completely different
director called me up and asked me to come in for an interview, and we spent the first twenty-five minutes just talking about that film. – [Sven] Which is a feature,
it’s not a documentary. And he just liked they way
that the film was told. (cinematic boom) – [Man] There’s a gentleman by the name of Richard Spencer. – [Sven] I got to tell
you, when I got that interview with Adam Bhala, they were set on cutting the documentary in Premier. And actually we cut our go-to editor course in Premier, as well. To be honest, I’m not
a huge fan of Premier. To be really honest, I
hadn’t worked on Premier before I took that job. – [Man] We all need to step up. We cannot ignore what’s out there. We gotta fight back. – [Sven] There’s this
misconception that you get hired because you’re really an expert in the software. The first job that I got was “Ghosts of the Abyss” right there. It’s a James Cameron film. They weren’t sending out ads or calling up agents saying, “Look find me an editor who can cut this film on Avid” I didn’t know Avid at all. The reason I got hired to do this project, was because of my work. And what was my work up to this point, being a film student? Well, I had just done a web-cast about an Indie Feature film that James Cameron’s little brother happened to see. So, he brought me in, not to cut “Ghosts of the Abyss”, but to do something very similar on a James
Cameron film and that ultimately developed
into a relationship where they would trust me to
become an editor on that. (woman breathing) So, work doesn’t necessarily
mean it has to be award-winning films in top tier festivals, work can be small, it just needs to be exciting, intriguing or promising. Recently, Aaron sent me a quick email with a link to a short. I didn’t know Aaron,
but he got my attention and I watched it, and I loved it. So, I replied, we met, we
worked on a project together. It was great. Now, we’re working on the next one. Aaron got two paying
jobs out of this so far, because of his work. The last reason why I think editors get hired and rehired. And so the final thing
is really the experience. The experience that people
have when they work with you. It’s the little things
and it’s the big things. Little things are like,
and it sounds like it’s a little thing, but its huge. Its like showing up on time. If you make the meeting and you’re there ten minutes early to
make sure you don’t miss it, you don’t come in late, that’s huge. A positive attitude. Even though I’m not
suggesting that you should be a Yes man in the
interview or in the bay, where you agree with everything. It is important that you
come off as a positive force. That you have something to contribute. (cellphone chime) Just got a text from Vinny and Steve. They’re outside, so lets
go get them and lets talk a little bit more
about the experience. (uplifting music)
♪ I will always fall high ♪ Vinny and Steve are talented, easy-going and they deliver. – Hey, hey. – [Sven] They possess all the traits of becoming go-to editors. He’s very excited to
meet you guys as always. – [Steve] Hey buddy. Sit, sit. Good girl. It didn’t make it in, so. (laugh) – [Sven] Come on in, it’s all set up. All right guys, thank
you so much for coming. This is Steve, this is Vinny. Steve and Vinny and I,
spent the last five to six months working on a very
special editing course. I thought I was going
to invite you guys over today to sort of talk a little bit about your journey as
career film-makers, editors. How do the two of you know each other? – So we both grew up in Reno, Nevada. And that’s kind of where we hail from, which is not known for film-making at all. So, I was working as an
editor at a local film company there and I was working for maybe about eight years there at the time. I was working on commercial stuff that was national and international brands. – [Deep Mans Voice] Are you ready? – [Vinny] Slowly, just
built a really good reel, like 300 plus videos from just doing that. There came a point where I
needed an assistant editor, so I brought Steve on
and gave him a try and he was working with me for a while there. – Nice
– Amazing experience. – Which is one way you
can become an editor, start off as an assistant.
– Which I fully, fully would say do it, if you get the opportunity. – Could you make a living
in Reno as an editor? – Yeah – Are there enough projects out in town? – Yeah there are. When I started, I started at a base level minimum wage, but that’s part of the process,
and you work your way up. Initially, by the time I
left there, I was making a good amount of money
for what I was doing. I have a totally livable,
comfortable wage. – And how long have you been in LA now? – We’ve been here since September, so just a little over six
months, close to seven months. – And hard was it to find a job here? – It was scary. Up front it was really scary. – Thats a bit of a different story. – Coming down here it’s
trying to reach out for a job. The ones that are posted
online are usually the bigger editing houses
and the people that are looking for that top level of skill. – I have to admit that
I don’t mind that its a little bit of a struggle
first to get a job, because… – I didn’t for the first
two months moving here. – Because, we met the first time actually face-to-face at EditFest – [Announcer] How many
are editors in this room? – [Sven] That’s where I
sort of proposed the idea, lets work on this editing course together, because I know you guys are going to be so busy, once you found
your footing in LA. Because, it is true in
LA, there’s always work. – You are not lying. – Once you’re in or once
you’ve shown that you can set the bar for a project,
you’re always working. – Yeah.
– And I already knew that you guys have the goods. So, I was like, are you willing to go along on this and then become a partner, equity partner in this idea,
and we build it together. And I really felt like
it was time, not just do stuff on YouTube and
talk about big picture editing concepts, but really figure out what does it take to
make a career in this. As we were building the
course, you were already using some of the later
lessons, in terms of how do you develop your career, to actually get a job to cut a TV show?
– That’s true. Editing four pilot episodes of a TV show. – [Sven] Wow, nice. Are you still working on it?
– I’m still working on it today and they’re already
talking about next season. – Hi and welcome. My name
is Sven and I’m an editor. Feels like I’m in AA meeting. What does it take to come a
successful, full-rate editor? Well, I’m going to show
you in this course. We divided it up into
five modules, so it starts off with the basics. If you really don’t know
anything about editing, this course is still good for you. If you don’t even have the
software, we’re working actually in the first
module, in DiVinci Resolve. It’s free, you can download
it and you can start editing. Take real footage, put it into the system and start cutting. And that’s what we do in the course. We have actually real
feature film footage, we have documentary footage, and we have brand of pieces, because
those are like the three most important fields, where you can make money as an editor. So, why don’t you guys, sort of walk us through this course and
give us a little overview of the different modules
and how that works. We start with just a couple basic editing tips to get us started. Majority of what you’re going
to be doing in narrative, might be quite a bit of
dialog, so J and L cuts really help us with keeping
the viewer within the scene in an interesting
way without losing them to visuals alone. – [Sven] Now, how about the footage. How do they get the footage? – [Steve] They get the
footage through the course. They download it on the third tab here. – [Sven] Not only do
you get to cut a scene and see what that feels
like to play with actors, that are actually real working actors. There’s an Academy Award winning actress, Melissa Leo in the film. Teresa Palmer, you might know her from Warm Bodies or Hawksaw Ridge. She has a TV show right
now, where she’s the lead. You get to work with the talent,
with that kind of material. Once you build one scene,
and you build the next scene, the third scene, you start thinking about how you’re going
to connect those scenes. What do you need to do
to shave off, or recut the scenes to really make the arc work. – [Vinny] So module two expands on where we left off on module one. What we get into there,
we start talking about what is story, what it
is that you’re trying to do as your editing. It’s not just about
smashing clips together and calling it good, its
about eliciting emotion, its about getting an idea
in there and presenting somebody with a new way of thinking. And that’s not easy to do. Rather than just handing
you a tutorial that says, “Hey. Here are the
technical aspects of it,” We’re giving you theory. This takes some conceptualization. So, trying to take a step back from what you are watching and actually thinking on what you just heard and
what you’re learning and practicing that, giving
it the mental exercise. So, those case studies will
really help you do that. – [Sven] And I can’t
emphasize enough, how great it is that we have access to real footage. Like, the documentary was in theaters, released by Magnolia Films. The feature premiered
at the LA Film Festival. And the brand of piece, its
incredible that we got a company to give us the
dailies of something they shot.
– Truly. – So, that students
have the opportunity to cut something that’s real and that’s out there compare to
what is actually being, and how this footage is actually being manipulated to tell the story. – Yeah, these are
nothing to be blinked at. – Results are really matters
and that’s why you’re here. – [Vinny] Module three
is probably one of the longest modules so far in this course. I think its great,
because this is actually giving you a lot of
information that you might not find anywhere else, because its about branding and nobody
wants to talk about what you actually need to do to sell yourself. Its all about what you need to do and to actually build yourself
up as a go-to editor. It’s important to know,
if you brand yourself right, you’ll start
respecting yourself more and then you’ll start feeling better about the work you do, and people will respect the work you do more. – That’s the kind of stuff that you learn in this course. Why it is so important to
become, not just an editor, but to become an editor that people call. That’s a position of power that you want to be in as an editor.
– [Steve] Truly. – [Sven] Because, then its really fun to be working in this
industry when you can really make choices that work for you. (message sent chime) – [Sven] The course is
only open for seven days, and then its going to be
closed for probably six months. You should really consider
to be part of that first wave, because you get that personal attention for sure, you get it at a better price than what it will be in the future. You should take a chance on yourself, you should invest in this course. And if you hate it, if
you don’t get anything out of it, you have a
six month guarantee that you can back out of it, as long as you do the exercises, as long as you watch the lessons and actually implemented that in those exercises, you have the right for six months to say, “this is bullshit. I didn’t
learn anything out of it,” because I feel like, you won’t do it. Guys, thank you so much for coming by. – Absolutely.
– Of course. – I’m going to leave a link there, and i’m excited now to play the
trailer that you cut for the course, that you get an idea in a much more sexier way than
us just talking about it. – Ya know, eight percent sexier. (laughs) (upbeat piano music) – [Sven] Almost daily, I
get asked this question more than any other. How do I become a working editor? Like, the kind of editor that works on recognizable features or on TV shows. The one that always works
and gets paid full rate. I just got this text the other day. – [Woman] Can I ask you something? – [Sven] Yes. – [Woman] I’m not an idiot.
This is my dream job. Its what I’ve wanted to be
since I was 15 years old. So, I prepared myself for the rejection that comes with the industry. But, did you ever have a time, that you were faced with rejection,
after rejection, after rejection, that
you considered quitting? It’s been three full
years of solid rejection, and honestly, I think
a human being can only take so much of it. – [Sven] Yes, I’ve been there. It sucks, but I figured out some stuff and I think I can help. I’ve had, what many consider
a successful editing career. I’ve worked three and a half
years for James Cameron, five plus years as the go-to
editor for Fremantle Media, the makers of American
Idol, cutting pilots and show concepts, helping them sell hundreds of millions of dollars
worth of new shows and I could pretty much name my rate. Is it because I’m so talented that I know more than any others? I don’t think so. It has to do with more than skill. It has to do with storytelling and with who you are as a person. I got another one from a producer I worked with seven years ago. – [Producer] Hey Sven. Remember me? Well, I’m doing this FOX show. Shooting ten episodes for air, looking for great editors. Still remember all the times you bailed me out, just wondering if you had any availability in the next four months. And if you can’t do it, other recommendations would be appreciated. – [Sven] Unfortunately, I’m not available. But, let me reach out to a few editors that I feel comfortable
recommending to you. – [Producer] Appreciate
the help my friend. – [Sven] Of course I
recommended the early editor from above, and she sent off her resume. For the past two and
a half years, I’ve put my editing life online
on a YouTube channel called, This Guy Edits. Currently, it has over
210,000 subscribers, that watch me edit and
talk about storytelling. I want to take this
experience to a new level, where I want to share
everything I know about being a go-to editor. The go-to editor, rarely
ever sends out a resume, because they’ve kept right
through the competition. The type of editor that
doesn’t work on a budget, and instead can demand a
rate that values their time. Because, what the go-to
editor brings to the table, saves the client, every time. The go-to editor course is the only one out there, that doesn’t
just teach you editing. It’s a step-by-step
program created to give you the tools to become
a go-to editor, so that you can work for a future that is bright. Starting with the basics,
then focusing on storytelling, exposing you to exercises
with real footage of actual features, documentaries
and brand of content. And on top, I’m giving
you a step-by-step program to brand yourself as a
go-to editor, including a mock-job interview
and negotiating tactics. I’ve put everything that
I know and I’ve learned in the past twenty years in this course. And here’s the thing, I
give you six months to change your mind, as long
as you do the exercises. Don’t see any value in the course? I will refund you the money. So, don’t miss out, don’t delay. The go-to editor course is only open for a few days, and then the doors will be shut, so I can focus on the students. Here’s how you become a go-to editor. (energetic music)

100 thoughts on “What gets you hired as a FILM & VIDEO EDITOR

  1. My anti-virus software doesn't allow me to open your website. It's just me? "website known for potentially dangerous content".

  2. Wow, what an outstanding idea. I wish I were young again and looking for a career. This is exactly the kind of class I would want to take. I just wish others did classes like this for other jobs so my kids could take them. :^)

  3. Are all editors supposed to be bugmen?
    Vegas Pro is high t & a tool of the samurai, just look at these guys & their fancy software. Sad!

  4. I love the idea and I am very interested in the course. So grateful for the opportunity you are giving people. I just wish it wasn't so expensive. 400$ is almost my rent pay and I just don't have the funds.

  5. I just checked thegotoeditor.com, and sadly I can't afford the course. It may be a lot to ask, but is there a way to pay on several months? Thanks for the answer Sven!

  6. Thank you for sharing your knowledge on this topic. I found this video extremely helpful and look forward to watching more of your content.

  7. I love to edit! However, I use a software that no really uses and I felt relieved when you said that you took a job where you had to use a software that you weren't familiar with. This gives me hope, definitely going to check out this course!

  8. what is operator job?? my teacher said it needs no creativity just copy paste type video operator job

  9. Sounds awesome but I just quit my job to work on my editing portfolio and I can’t afford $380 🙁 Hopefully I can further down the line

  10. Do you only do editing? It seems to me that lately I've been getting more and more requests to do on-site shooting, complex animations, and other stuff besides just editing. I guess for someone like you that has achieved certain status you only edit and that's it. For a struggling freelancer like me I sometimes have to do even graphic design or else the client will go elsewhere.

  11. This is probably the best promo video for a course. And probably this is the best course on editing. The price is good, you get more than you pay. Unfortunately, I can't afford it right now. I'll be in the next wave, for sure.

  12. By the way I Love the concept of this course, I think it is unique and while there is a lot of free editing related stuff on YouTube, your content stands out, and I think 379 Dollars are absolutely reasonable for anyone who SERIOUSLY wants to be a working editor. I mean even if you dont have the money you could borrow it from friends or parents who understand that this is your passion and you csn pay them back at your own pace.

  13. I would love to sign up, but I don't have the money right now. Let's see if I can make another $200 before the deadline.

  14. I have been searching for a new way in my life for a long time now. I rediscovered my love for film which seems odd because it was never really gone. I did my first edit of a short essay a week ago, what i wanted to do for so long. I never had so much fun working on something in a very very long time. I have been following you for a longer time now. And you announce your course that i was looking forward to so much on my birthday. Well…. i am in i guess. (Is there a limited number of people allowed for now until the countdown runs out? Because i still need some time to clear the money for it)
    Thanks!
    Bernd

  15. Thank you so much for giving your efford into the community. You give us your knowlege and your time tonhelp us to make our way.

  16. Nice video! Bit of personal random trivia: I also used that cello track (pretty sure it's from Epidemic sound) and also that close up stock shot of the fingers on the keyboard from Shutterstock in a corp short form edit a few months back!

  17. can you please arrange some way to pay in 3 times. i am really willing to buy your course . but i don't have much money to pay at once.

  18. Kinda wish i didnt already have a carrier, i would so take this. 🙂 Price is soo affordable. The content looks great. And as one if the firsts you are sure to have some great connection out of this. Thats the real value. Ppl who say they need this but dont have the money… come on, this would be great with an extra 1 before the price.

  19. i really want this course from past 6 months am looking for a job but i really don't have money for this course i wish i had i love your lessons.

  20. wld be great if in the future, the modules and dailies etc can be purchased standalone without the review process (as important as it is) since timing is tricky

  21. Hello, I have 2 quick questions. First, is this course a good fit for an absolute beginner? Second, would the experience from this course be enough for a newbie to get a job? Thanks in advance… love the channel and content. Have a great day.

  22. Well… There goes the Coach bag I wanted… Watching the first lesson now. I have been waiting for this course since it was first hinted at. I am excited to finally see it realized. Thanks Sven!!!

  23. I've always been a go-to editor, but I'm afraid to take the leap and make it my full-time job because everyone asks for motion graphics and I just want to tell stories 🙁

  24. Would love to see you on skillshare! Unfortunately $380 is not worth it for me. Putting that towards a new lens or rent is just more of a priority

  25. This certainly sounds like a course that I am interested in. I work as a editor in a corporate office, and one of the toughest things for me, is being able to make new reels and pieces for my portfolio due to lack of time gathering good footage (a full-time job, where I can't use anything I work on in my reels). I notice that the course allows us to use some really good quality content, but I see that one of the rules is we are not allowed to use any of it in our reels. I can understand any legal reasons as to why this is the case, but is there any chance we would be provided with content that we may be able to use freely in our portfolios?

    Thanks again for the hard work you, and your team have put in to this course.

  26. hi Sven i saw that You put an option for 3 mount payment since, its great for us with no money in pocket 🙂 my question is if i pay first rate can i watch video tutorials, and other question witch is biggest issue for me is this Course more for Branding and getting job as an Editor or how to become an creative editor and storyteller, so why I am asking You this , i wanna make an documentary i have all materials from my best friend who is truth seeker since he had a big accident in his life , it will be only like a gift to him but still i wanna make the best as I can so do You reccomend me this course for this…
    I love your work and if I can learn skills like yours or just basics i will buy your course but if your video are mor branding like and get a Job for nnow this topic is aint for me.

    THX for response

  27. The course looks great but, do you address how to market yourself as an editor outside of the Hollywood or New York areas? Or am I going to have to convince my wife to move again?

  28. ohhh myyyyy!!! I'm so thankful I saw this, and I really want to enrol in this course now! But unfortunately, I don't have a budget yet huhu I hope I can still make it before the enrollments will close tho! What an opportunity this is!

  29. I wonder how you compare to Inside the Edit? I am really thinking about enhancing my video editing skills. It's been a while since I've been out of school and it doesn't seem like anyone wants to hire me. It's been tough especially when you have a family to take care of. I've been doing everything to get my name out there. I'll keep pushing nonetheless.

  30. WOW! I have been following you for sometime and have learned many things already. Social learning is just so accessible! I totally agree with the idea that you can just go for it with limited knowledge if you are willing to sacrafice. of course then you also have to deliver lol

    glad you got to get your knowledge down!

  31. Man, you're just awesome! I've been watching your videos for like 2 years, since i got in a film school here in Brazil and i can totally say that i love your work. Your conception and care about all the little things envolved in the editing process makes me want to go editor (haha) more and more. I was always scary and shy to comment bellow in your videos but wow! It's an editing course with you now that's being talking here on your channel, and i love it. Just love it. The price is a little bit steep, but it seems right according to the content. I may have to save money to run for it. However, congratulations on another conquest in your career.

  32. Seriously love this channel but wish this wasn't an ad in disguise. Maybe titling it about the course would have been better.

  33. what I don't understand in editing, is that I feel like you are only as good as the footage… you say "tell the story" but if you don't have the shots to tell a story, you can only do the best of what you can with what you got. I feel there is creative room, but mostly technical. Editors don't shoot the footage…

  34. Hey Sven, I'm thinking i''m in your intermediate category (and mature age) but I really enjoy your approach. I've been cutting weddings for 6 years (but just closed that chapter to move into more animation type stuff) but am editing everyday in my corporate gig. So in essense, I like what I'm seeing in your course around asset management and story development (as that is the real 'editing' magic). While I'm not seeking a job as an editor I think this skillset is so undetected by the client but an absolute MUST to make brilliant stuff – if I'm not seeking a job and definitely not young do you think this course is still for me.

  35. Can anyone answer me please?I am very interested in this course, but I want to know whether the materiasl used in the exercise is a complete film?The most attractive part of this course is the opportunity to edit a film (not a short or some parts of scenes)

  36. This looks amazing! Editing is definitely the career I want to launch myself onto, and I feel like this would be a perfect fit. I only have a few days left to think about it, but… let's see what happens!

  37. I have just completed as much of this course that is available (the last few segments of the course are not released yet), and here are my thoughts: First, the way it is now, it IS for absolute beginners. I am by no means an advanced film editor, but found everything so far to be at a very basic level (ie., explaining J and L cuts, teaching basic DaVinci Resolve — which I don't use). I won't say that I've learned absolutely nothing, but my takeaways have been very few. My main critique of the course is that as you watch edits being made (the "Case Study") — which are the most valuable parts of this course — there isn't often an explanation of why (for example: I am moving this here…because it will do this) or how it will change the story or the scene. I can see it in his eyes when he's cutting, but the explanation is left out. One of the films being edited is in German, and even though I actually speak some German, I found it kind of excruciating to watch a scene being edited without knowing exactly what was being said by the actors (occasionally the gist of the dialogue is given) and therefore be able to judge performances. Understanding what an editor does technically is valuable, but it only makes you a competent editor. It's how you shape the story (and why) that would make you a go-to one. The career advice — branding, interviewing, setting your rate — is valuable but, again, for beginners. If you've interviewed and been hired for a job before, there isn't much to see here. Finally, the cost: $380. This course is severely overpriced, based on the value of other online courses that are out there. My mind went to Masterclass.com where, for $180/year, you have full access to dozens of complete master classes (each longer than this one) by Martin Scorsese, Jodie Foster, Werner Herzog, etc. This is more than double that price, and four times more than buying just one of those courses. Lynda.com ($30/mo) also has a ton of courses available for so much less. The money-back guarantee requires that you watch all the videos AND do all the exercises AND wait 8 weeks before you can request a refund; I think you should be able to leave the course if it's clear very quickly that it's not for you. This policy isn't disclosed up front, which feels deceptive. Overall: if you are a beginning editor, you could learn a lot from this, and $380 is a lot less expensive than film school (or even one course there). Sven is clearly a talented and skilled editor. If you have any experience editing at all, though, I don't think this is for you. I would describe it as being able to take you from crawling to walking, but not walking to running. This has been my experience. I didn't learn anything substantial from this course, but you may.

  38. Thanks, Thisguyedits! Just a beautiful day that I noticed this video on Youtube. I have already bought the course and I'm on module 2 already. From Russia (Moscow) with love!

  39. Parker Walbeck used your soundtrack in his video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gSYQWtEPbs. The best videographer ever.

  40. 🤣😂🤣😂🤣😂🤣😂 he’s less of a go-to editor and more of a go-to business man….

  41. In the first 20 seconds I completely lost count as to how many cuts there were. That's not really "editing" that's ADHD.

  42. Hi Sven,
    I saw this video for the first time a couple hours after it was uploaded. I've been thinking really hard about buying the course. I have once concern though, and I hope you'll be able to answer before the time limit runs out tomorrow. If not, no worries. I asked last second, so I understand if you can't respond on a Friday night/Saturday morning.

    I want to buy the course, but my computer struggles with editing high resolution videos. Even with proxies, I freeze up all the time. In my budget, I am going to buy a beast of a computer towards the end of August 2019. I want to take the course, but I don't think I'll be able to take it until I get a new computer late August/early September. Is that too late for me to start the course? If it is, I can wait for the next wave. If not, I'd love to sign up now.

    Thanks Sven! I appreciate your work and dedication to editing!
    Sean Carruthers

  43. I signed up for the course on the first day and I can tell you that it's very good. Access to real Hollywood footage, instructional/Inspirational videos, and discussion boards to share you work and solicit feedback from other creators. If you're starting off as an editor, or even have some experience and looking to improve your overall creative workflow, I highly recommend it. Plus, there is a money guarantee if you're not satisfied. I wasn't asked to post this comment but the quality is just so good that I wanted to share my experience so far. Cheers!

  44. I am literally on fire to learn everything about filmmaking, it's just my income isn't ok right now cause i'm investing on some gears. I'll promise myself to invest on knowledge like this when I got some money. UGH!

  45. Lmao I just hustle and fuck shit up you just gotta work💯💯💯💯💯💯💯💯💯

  46. Average salaries for editors are a fraction of what they used to be, and the downward trend hasn't improved. Back in the 80's a UK video editor could be making £50k-100+k p.a. In the 80s!
    Chances of being in a high payed select group are mathematically near zero given the market supply, but there is plenty of work. Long hours, fixed deals, low hourly rates. It's not the profession it once was. But then that's no different for most of the post production industry. And given the high cost of living in a thriving capital like London… make sure you're amazing and couldn't see yourself doing anything else in life. Just don't do it because you think you might earn a fortune.
    The death of a profession at root is like the death of most professions, especially in the creative sector… college courses, universities. Churning out to oversaturate a market place, as opposed to the old way. Interns and working your way up.
    However, there are other avenues opening up to be had if you have the skills of an editor, and who knows what opportunities will come from that.

  47. Great price point for the course and people need to see it's an investment, as unless you do not do anything with the information you will not see a return.

  48. Even with the payment plan, I simply cannot afford it. This is something that I've been waiting for, because you've taught me so much already! The truth is I need more work to buy the course, even though the course would help me get more work. Life's funny that way I guess.

  49. I have just found your channel and got to say thank you really appreciate the time your putting in to share your knowledge and experiences.

  50. Nice commercial to lure new filmmakers. I am wondering how you're going to teach them not how but when and why to cut!

  51. Sería genial que tus vídeos estuvieran subtitulados al español. Te aseguras miles de suscriptores!

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